About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
, but the tip of the iceberg on terms of what was on iewfer for -- offer for non-fiction. >> host: bob, same question. >> guest: right. it was a big year for dead presidents. caro's, the fourth of probably five volumes on lyndon johnson, just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a general figure in 20th century american history. also, goodwin's book "team of rivals," published in 2005 is back on the best seller list thanks to steven spielberg's movie, "lincoln," and on our list, it's number 20, remarkable for a serious book that's been out for so long. also, john's biography of thomas jefferson. just when you think there's no more to be said, someone writes a popular, read readable, somewhat controversial book. >> host: hard to mention dead presidents and not mention "killing lincoln" and "killing kennedy" both best sellers. >> guest: bill and his writing partner, martin. i introduced bill about his process. o'riley says the partner does the research, and he does the writing. he has the idea to write history like a thriller, not in an academicceps. you have to trust him wher
weinman is the news director for "publishers marketplace" and bob minitz heymer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today." .. publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those olympic first stage apportion of bush publishing news. on the nonfiction front is a very strong year. in particular receipt of the best of 2012 list dominated by the likes of catherine coos behind beautiful forever is the witch was the winner of the national book award. the ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew solomon's fire from the tree, only recently published over 900 each companion he had the king of different child-rearing examples of special needs children. so these two books on a very substantial books, but they're the tip the iceberg of nonfiction. >> host: minzesheimer, same question. >> guest: it was a big year for dead presidents. she remember robert harris is the fourth of five on monday june 10, which was just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a secret 20th century history. dirt since goodman spoke spoken a team of riva
into this further because i i think this is on c-span and i am still friends with bob. but i was paid an average i think my take-home pay for two weeks was $350 for two weeks. i live with two elderly ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. i had nothing. whenever anybody complains when they're young and they complain about trying to find a job, i go, try living with two old ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. try it. then they invited their older sister to live with them. so there were three. anyway, apparently ronald reagan twice a year goes to people's houses to have dinner. chose to go to my boss' house. so i ago, what do you need quick so of course i'm mowing the lawn and washing the windows. i'm hoping that over time undoing all of this stuff sooner or later he was a greg, you can stick around and meet the president. and sooner or later like days and days of preparation, that's what happened and he asked me. the high point, a couple of high point to meeting ronald reagan. one of them was when the dog sniffing bob's came in and urinated on my boss' briefcase. [lau
for the american spectator which was run by bob gerald. an interesting guy. for i went to the drugstore lot picking up mysterious things. i won't get into this further. 5 with paid, my take-home pay was $360 for two weeks. i lived with two elderly ladies on george mason drive in arlington, va.. i had nothing. when somebody complains about tried to find a job by 65 living with two old ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia and they invited their older sister to live with them. their work three. anyway. ronald reagan a year ago to -- go to my boss's house, what do you need? i am mulling the lawn and washing the windows and hoping over time i am doing all of this stuff that sooner or later he will say stick around and meet the president and sooner or later after days and days of preparation that is what happened. the high point, there are a couple high points. one of them was when the bomb sniffer dogs urinated on my boss's briefcase. to this day he thinks it was me. it might have been. the great thing about dogs, they don't live long enough to tell stories. the unicorn 03 year. the dinne
that joke about bob is that he is a lovable guy. [laughter] are we going to make a speech about bob? because i will. i've got nothing to do. bob is a great guy. this is on c-span and he will say why are you defending me? bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. [laughter] i should shut up. i should just quit. another thing i have in common with ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. on june 12, 19 and seven he told soviet premier gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured serving and wearing a fur costume. all she does is go around central park and take pictures of this poor sweaty men man all over central park. it's disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influence millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
and talk to senators and found a few off the record and one on the record. bob bennett that was in the senate of mitch mcconnell and he said yes, mitch mcconnell said that we are going to try to block everything. we can't block it, we will throw as much sand in the works as we can. of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to rise, a lot of time on the floor, as we go through this process, and then if you achieve this cloture, allowing 30 hours of post-cloture debate, you can command a full 30 hours that you don't even have to debate. it becomes a very tempting tool to use -- four times become a precious commodity. it points to what passes unanimously that was taken through. in the case of bills, emotion, a filibuster on the motion to proceed. which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly. all designed to use up more floor time. that is the restoration of the majority. now we can get to the appropriation of the minority. in the fact is that we do have something that is a chicken and egg problem. we saw
it up to the mid-30s. bob dole, in the middest of the sentiment in fact 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the imagine irk 40% that carl thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing the questions. you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino vote moving a million-two, a million-three, you know, what the turnout is is we don't really know yet. it will take awhile. the exit poll numbers lose credibility as time goes on, but i don't want to get too geeky with you, but say, you know, shift of a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid-30s in terms of the share saying that was a good night for republicans. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states? i know you were going to ask. [laughter] >> then i want to go down the road. >> it's interesting because it doesn't -- it would have -- if the exit polls were correct, which is insent, shifted 10% of the vote out of obama's column on romney's column, romney would have squeaked florida. clearly,
in the state. >> anybody want to comment? >> go ahead. >> i agree. with everything you said, bob. i think that we need more portability in registration and seeking ways we can get that person to a regular ballot. i think that's a problem, the provisional ballot whether it's the poll workers needing better access to database and making sure the election officials have enough phone lines for the poll workers to work with. it seemed to be dave connect when voters show up at improper locations, and then of course the folks say we should be doing everything we can could count every bullate -- every ballot. there's michigan that prevent someone from verifying the ballot and no reason states should be resisting that. >> i think you're totally right on, this statewide portability issue. that was juan of the most cynical laws i saw passed in 2010 and 2011. it wasn't solving any problem to say you had to reregister when you move and there's no reason you should have to do that. in addition, in early vote, there's no reason we can't systems in place where you can vote anywhere in a county. and in oh
to many of you called the criterion by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book on this real first behind the scenes book. the theme of the book with all the justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand warren burger. they thought he was a pompous. that sort of contentiousness is in the rule more than the exception in the history of the supreme court. i don't know how many of you have had the misfortune to hear that justice is served from 1914 to 1941 name james mcreynolds, who such an appalling anti-semite ditties stick it a family whenever justice cardozo would speak. a cantankerous one summer had a car accident and drove his car off a cliff in the first question of who inhabit the corba service felix frankfurter at the time they hated each other so much they thought the frankfurter might've driven him off. [laughter] i was hoping a teacher and a list that i would find this cd center of the rehnquist court and the history. to my great disappointments of the journalists, but so much satisfaction as a citizen, i went rehnquist is very popular among his colleagues. he basic
to several ways but what if that not so? would've governor bob, president elect romney decides it's not how he wishes to govern wallcovering and the motive is first 22 years when he was governor of massachusetts. they uniformly said they be disappointed and one of the stars at the tea party freshman class he's teaching them about says it will be an insurrection. people seemed generally boisterous. you say nothing at. the president promised us not behave like a conservative, it's going to be the death of the republican party, but were going to burn it down. >> and is going to let that sit there for a second, but that's the great and am then asked the next question. let's come back to the leadership. specifically as individuals in a threesome with a do or do not work together, boehner, cantor and mccarthy. characteristic uninsured and beginning the speaker boehner. >> john boehner is a washington my friend was not obvious choice to leave the tea party class. nonetheless he could be the tea party phenomenon for the freight train that was then elected to be on the train rather than underneath i
up to the mid 30s. ronald reagan brought it up to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping-off point for neutralizing all these questions. so, you know, how -- we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino votes, moving a million two, million three, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is we don't really know yet. it's going the take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> john king. >> geeky with you. yeah. [laughter] but the shift of a million voters, million and a half voters and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share. and everybody would have said that was a pretty good night for a republican. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row to get everyone. >> it's interesting, because it d
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13